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Knowing When to Replace Your Welding Jacket

a man wearing a stylish welding clothing

A Welding Jacket is a vital piece of protective equipment for welders, shielding them from sparks, molten metal, and intense heat generated during welding processes. However, like any protective gear, welding jackets have a finite lifespan and must be replaced when they no longer provide adequate protection. Knowing when to change or replace welding jackets is crucial to maintaining the safety and well-being of welders. Here are some welding welding jacket tips to know.

a man wearing a leather welding jacket
A man weather a leather welding jacket

When to Replace Your Welding Jacket

Visible Damage

One of the primary indicators that a welding jacket needs replacement is visible damage. Constant exposure to sparks, spatter, and abrasive surfaces can cause wear and tear on the fabric of the jacket over time. Look for signs such as tears, holes, or fraying seams, as these compromise the integrity of the jacket and reduce its ability to protect against hazards. Even small damages should not be ignored, as they can quickly worsen and expose the wearer to potential injuries.

FR Properties 

Another factor to consider is the condition of the flame-resistant properties of the jacket. Welding jackets are typically made from flame-resistant materials such as leather or flame-retardant fabrics, which are designed to withstand high temperatures without catching fire. However, prolonged exposure to heat, UV radiation, or harsh chemicals can degrade these properties over time, rendering the jacket less effective in protecting against flames and thermal hazards. If there is any doubt about the continued flame-resistant properties of the jacket, it is best to replace it to ensure the safety of the welder.

a man wearing a hybrid welding jacket
Waylander Welding Jacket with Leather Sleevs

Changes in Fit or Comfort

Changes in fit or comfort can also indicate the need for replacement. Welding jackets that have become too tight, too loose, or uncomfortable to wear may hinder the welder’s mobility and compromise their ability to work safely. Additionally, jackets that no longer provide adequate ventilation can cause discomfort and heat stress, posing a risk to the welder’s health and well-being. If a welding jacket is no longer comfortable or does not fit properly, it should be replaced with one that offers a better fit and greater comfort.

Overall Condition of the Welding Jacket

Finally, consider the overall condition of the jacket and its suitability for the specific welding applications and environments. Welding jackets that have been extensively worn or have reached the end of their recommended lifespan may no longer provide sufficient protection for the hazards present in the workplace. Regular inspections and assessments of welding jackets, along with adherence to manufacturer guidelines, are essential for ensuring the safety of welders and preventing accidents and injuries.

Knowing when to change or replace welding jackets is essential for maintaining the safety and well-being of welders. By paying attention to signs of damage, monitoring flame-resistant properties, assessing fit and comfort, and considering the overall condition of the jacket, employers can ensure that welders are adequately protected from the hazards of the welding environment.

Pigskin Leather vs. Cowhide Leather for Welding Clothing

a man wearing a pigskin leather welding clothing

When it comes to welding, safety is paramount. Proper welding attire is essential to protect yourself from sparks, molten metal, and other hazards. Two popular choices for welding clothing are pigskin leather and cowhide leather. Each has its own unique characteristics, and choosing the right one depends on your specific needs and preferences.

Pigskin Leather: Lightweight and Flexible

pigskin leather

Pigskin leather is often the preferred choice for welding gloves and aprons. One of its standout features is its lightweight and flexible nature. Welders who require precision and dexterity in their work often choose pigskin leather because it allows for more nimble movements.

Despite its relatively thin texture, pigskin leather provides excellent protection against heat and sparks. Its natural fire resistance makes it ideal for welding tasks. Pigskin also has good breathability, which can be a significant advantage during long welding sessions, as it reduces sweat and discomfort.

Furthermore, pigskin leather is less expensive than cowhide leather, making it a practical choice for welders on a budget. However, it may not be as durable as cowhide leather, and it can wear out faster in heavy-duty applications.

Cowhide Leather: Durability and Robust Protection

Cowhide leather, on the other hand, is the go-to choice for heavy-duty welding clothing. It’s thicker and more robust compared to pigskin leather, providing superior protection against sparks and molten metal splashes. This durability makes cowhide leather ideal for welders who are exposed to harsh conditions regularly.

leather welding jacket

Cowhide leather is also known for its impressive abrasion resistance. If you’re working in an environment where your clothing might come into contact with abrasive surfaces, cowhide is the better option.

While cowhide is tougher than pigskin, it is heavier and less flexible. This can limit dexterity, making intricate welding tasks more challenging. Additionally, cowhide tends to be less breathable than pigskin, which can lead to discomfort during prolonged use, especially in hot environments.

Choosing the Right Leather for You

Ultimately, the choice between pigskin and cowhide leather for welding clothing depends on your specific welding needs and personal preferences.

Choose pigskin leather

if you require a lightweight and flexible option, prioritize dexterity, and work in a relatively low-intensity welding environment. Pigskin is also the more budget-friendly option.

Opt for cowhide leather

if you need maximum durability and protection in a heavy-duty welding setting. Cowhide excels in providing robust defense against sparks and abrasions, making it ideal for welders facing extreme conditions.

Remember that your safety should always be the top priority. Regardless of the type of leather you choose, make sure your welding clothing fits properly and provides adequate coverage. Regularly inspect and maintain your welding attire to ensure it continues to protect you effectively. Ultimately, the right choice of leather for welding clothing can make a significant difference in your safety and comfort on the job.

What’s the best Leather for Welding?

best leather for welding

Leather is a natural material that has been used for centuries to make clothes, shoes, and other items. It is made from animal skin and fat and can be made from many different animals including cows, elks, pigs, goats, deer, and sheep. All these types of leather have their own unique properties which can be used to determine the best type to use in certain situations. Here we talk about the best leather for welding for the best welding protection

 

Types of Leather, what’s the best leather for welding?

Before we decide on anything, it’s best to get to know the types of leather and what makes them different from each other. 

 

Goatskin

Goatskin is suitable for jobs requiring high tensile strength and flexibility. This type of leather is thin, soft, and pliable but it provides excellent protection against cuts and abrasion. The higher lanolin levels in the skin provide a moisture barrier, and the thin nature of the material allows for excellent fingertip control. 

 

Because of this, Goatskin leather is ideal for MIG welding. When combined with dexterity, it makes an excellent choice for TIG welding. Kidskin, very soft and lightweight leather from young goats also provides the required durability and abrasion resistance and is the highest quality leather for fingertip sensitivity.

 

Cowhide

The most common type of leather used for welding clothing is cowhide leather. This is because it is durable and flexible. It can withstand the heat generated by the welding process and will not melt like other types of leather would.

 

Its tough structure resists abrasion, sparks, and spatter, making it an excellent choice for tough jobs involving metal inert gas and stick welding. Cowhide is naturally water- and dirt-resistant, making it simple to care for. Although slightly more durable than elkskin, it is not as soft. 

 

Cowhide, on the other hand, is preferred over other non-leather materials for comfort, allowing it to be worn for longer periods of time. Cowhide leather is an excellent choice due to its abundant supply and durability.

 

welder at work

Deerskin

Deerskin gets its toughness from the fact that deer spend so much of their time in thorny, rough environments. Despite its toughness, deerskin leather is lightweight and pliable, making it one of the softest and warmest leathers readily accessible. It’s also one of the few types of leather that, when wet, returns to its original shape and softness. Thicker cuts of deerskin leather are ideal for MIG welding, while thinner cuts are ideal for TIG welding.

 

Pigskin

Pigskin is a dense leather, so it is less flexible than other leathers on the market. But because of the small pores in the skin, it allows the wearer’s skin to breathe which is great for welding gloves. Pigskin leather has a supple feel and retains its softness after being wet. Pigskin leather, though, is not recommended for use in areas where moisture levels are typically high. This type of leather is ideal for MIG and stick welders who require a high level of durability.

 

Elkskin

Elkskin leather is one of the softest and thickest leathers available. It’s the most heat-, flame-, and abrasion-resistant leather, and it won’t harden as quickly as other options. It remains soft even in hot and humid conditions and conforms to your hand, allowing you to move freely and comfortably. Elkskin’s heat resistance makes it ideal for stick welding.

 

Sheepskin

Unlike other leathers, sheepskin is tanned with the wool intact. Wool acts as an insulator and is resistant to flames and static electricity. Sheepskin is thin and elastic, allowing for flexibility and sensitivity, making it ideal for TIG welding. Its natural lanolin content helps heal sensitive and inflamed skin, and the fibers absorb perspiration.

Best Welding Jacket for Summer

welder working under the sun

Spring is here and that means summer is just around the corner! It’s back to welding in hot temperatures. That means it’s time for you to suit up! Get yourself a breathable welding jacket or a lightweight welding jacket that will give you the comfort you need while also getting maximum protection. But with all the options out there for welding jackets, how do you choose the best one? Here are some factors you need to consider in buying the best welding jacket for summer.

 

Your Guide to Buying the Best Welding Jacket for Summer 

Material

The first thing you need to consider is the type of material. During the summer, you need something lightweight and breathable. The best material for a summer welding jacket is cotton. For this season, the less leather the better. 

 

While leather is the best material for welding jackets, using cotton welding jackets in the summer will increase airflow which then provides more breathable comfort. Plus, leather welding jackets can get heavy. Cotton welding jackets are lighter which gives you more room for movement.

 

welding under the sun

Color

This can sometimes be overlooked. As you know, a brighter color deflects sunlight while a darker color absorbs heat. So in choosing a summer welding jacket, go for the lighter shades. 

 

Comfort

When it comes to buying the best welding jacket for the summer, always go for one size bigger than your actual or usual size. If you go with your usual size, it may feel too tight which you wouldn’t want at all. With the extra heat during this season, you’d want all the breathing room and comfort you can get. 

 

welder at work

Type of Welding

Whatever type of welding you do, you always need welding PPE. Safety is always a must. If you do TIG weld, you don’t get too exposed to spatter. In this case, some would just use a welding shirt. But for the other types of welding processes, you are definitely exposed to more spatter which could burn through any fiber. 

 

Consider alternatives like a hybrid welding jacket – a cotton welding jacket with leather welding sleeves. There are options like this that you could get so you don’t worry about getting unwanted burns. 

 

These are some factors to consider in buying the best welding jacket for the summer. If you want to invest in something, invest in premium welding clothing. Invest in comfort and maximum protection!

Winter Welding Apparel Must-Haves

welder working in the winter

Winter in the United States starts in December and lasts through March between fall and spring. This season, it can be challenging to weld because it really gets cold as temperatures can reach as low as 3 °F. This means, aside from your welding PPE or leather welding clothing in place, you need some other welding apparel to give you that extra warmth to protect you from the harsh weather. Here we give you the winter welding apparel you need during this season. 

 

Winter Welding Apparel: What You Need

1 Beanie 

The first thing you need is a high-quality beanie. This is a must-have to keep your head warm. Get one that covers even your ears and one that does not come off easily. If you aren’t that comfortable with a beanie, you can always go for a welding cap. If you want, you can also wear them both. A beanie over that welding cap. Another option for you to get heat and protection is a leather welding hood. 

 

2 Hoodie

Get yourself a comfortable hoodie. The idea is for you to stay as warm as possible. If you wear a pancake for work, wearing a hoodie over that pancake will give you that coverage you need for your head and neck against the cold temperatures. On top of that, you can wear your leather welding jacket. If temperatures get really low and it gets really cold, you can get a heavyweight hoodie instead or wear a vest over that hoodie for more warmth. 

 

3 Facemask 

Some beanies have a built-in facemask. If yours doesn’t, then get a facemask that is most comfortable for you. It helps keep your face warm most especially when it’s windy. 

 

4 Bandana

Wear a bandana on your neck so you are sure to feel warmer while at work. Use a slipknot when you tie it that way you can easily take it off in case it catches on fire. 

 

welder welding in the winter

5 White Cotton Gloves

Bear in mind that you must have welding gloves while welding. These white cotton gloves are just there to use if you are not welding and maybe while on a break. This will constantly give you that warmth you need so your hands aren’t stiff when you start working. If it’s comfortable for you, you can even wear them under your welding gloves as well. Hand warmers are also great to have in your pocket just in case. 

 

6 Thermal underwear

A great piece of apparel you can have is thermal underwear – top and bottom. This can trap the heat in your body so you feel warmer. 

 

7 Coveralls

If in case it gets extremely cold, get yourself a high-quality coverall. You can wear this over your hoodie and welding jacket. This blocks the wind all the more. 

 

8 Feet Warmers

Get some feet warmers and put them on top of your toes to stay warm for at least half a day.

Welding Clothing Tips to Keep Safe from 5 Welding Hazards

welding hazard

Safety is always a priority for welders. According to Occupational Health and Safety, there are five potential welding safety hazards to avoid – electric shock, fumes and gases, fire and explosions, injuries from insufficient PPE, and other safety considerations. Here we give you some welding clothing tips, what to wear and what not to wear to protect yourself from these welding hazards and avoid them while at work.

 

Welding Clothing tips to keep safe from the 5 Welding Safety Hazards

Electric Shock

Electric shock happens when a welder touches two metal objects that have a voltage between them. For example, if a welder holds a wire in one hand and a second wire with another. Electric current will pass through the wire and then through the welder which can then cause an electric shock. 

 

Secondary voltage shock which ranges from 20-100 volts is the most common type of electric shock. Fifty (50) volts or less can be enough to cause death. 

 

Among all the safety hazards, electric shock is one of the most threatening of them all. This can lead to severe injury or even death. This can either be caused by the shock itself or from the fall as a reaction to the shock. 

 

Welding clothing tips to avoid electric shock: 

To protect oneself from electric shock, wear rubber boots and rubber pads, especially when working in wet or humid conditions. Make sure your hands are dry during a welding operation. Wear rubber gloves under the welding gloves to get maximum protection. Also, use an insulation mat under the operator. 

 

welder working

Fumes and Gases

Exposure to fumes and gases is hazardous the health. As a welder, you get exposed to these every day. These fumes contain harmful metal oxide compounds from base metal, consumables, and base metal coatings. 

 

It’s very important that you keep your head out of these fumes and have enough ventilation so you can control your exposure to them.

 

Welding clothing tips avoid fumes and gases: 

Position your face as far as possible from the fumes while at work. Also, wear an approved respirator to make sure you don’t exceed the OSHA permissible exposure limits to these fumes. Another tip would be to remove any coating of paint from the metal you’re welding to avoid the production of other toxic gases. 

 

welder working

Fire and Explosions

A welding arc produces extreme temperatures that can reach 10,000 degrees Fahrenheit which becomes a fire explosion hazard. The arch itself isn’t the real danger. It’s the heat near the arc and the sparks and spatters created by it. These sparks can reach up to 35 feet away from a welding space and can reach flammable materials around or clothing that are not flame resistant which can then cause fires and explosions. 

 

Welding clothing tips to avoid fire and explosions:

Before welding, remove any flammable materials from the area or put a flame-retardant blanket or welding blanket over flammable materials to be extra safe. These could either be liquid (gasoline and oil), solid (wood, paper, cardboard), or gas (acetylene, hydrogen, propane). Make sure to use Flame Retardant or FR clothing. These include your FR welding jacket, FR welding pants, FR welding shirts, and other welding protective clothing like leather welding aprons, welding spats, welding hoods, and welding sleeves that give extra protection from welding sparks and splatters. 

 

Injuries/burns from Insufficient PPE

The most common injury welders get while at work are welding burns. This happens when welding operators have insufficient personal protective equipment while working. 

 

Welding clothing tips to avoid injuries/burns:

The right welding PPE allows adequate movement and comfort while also providing protection from welding hazards. Choose leather and flame retardant-treated cotton welding clothing. These are the best if you’re looking for durability and fire resistance properties. 

 

In wearing welding PPE, avoid rolling up your sleeves or pant cuffs and keep your welding pants over work boots to avoid any deposit of sparks or hot metal. Wear a helmet and wear safety glasses to prevent sparks from hitting the eyes. Use leather boots that give ankle coverage or wear leather welding spats to get foot protection. 

 

Use flame-retardant gloves to protect your hands from burns and scratches or other injuries you get from electric shocks. Use helmets with shields to protect the eyes and skin from exposure to arc rays. To protect your ears from noise, wear earmuffs or hearing protection to protect your hearing from any damage. This would also prevent metal or any other debris from entering the ear canal. 

 

welder working

Other Safety considerations within the work environment

Never underestimate other safety considerations within the work environment like working in a confined space or in an elevated area, paying attention to safety data sheets by the manufacturer or safety information on products used, and knowing the proper safety practices in the workplace. 

While complete welding PPE from head to toe is a must for protection, common sense in the workplace is also key. Remove clutter or debris, keep hands away from sharp edges, and follow simple safe practices and tips that can go a long way and minimize any workplace injuries.

How To Clean Leather Welding PPE

welder in a leather welding apron

Welders take care of their welding gear and equipment. But when it comes to taking care of their welding personal protective equipment, not a lot can say they make it a priority. Some just wait for their welding jackets or welding gloves to wear out. When that happens, their solution is just to buy a new one. What if we tell you there’s a way you can extend the life span of your leather welding PPE? Here’s how. 

 

How to Clean Leather Welding PPE 

Leather is a common material used when it comes to safety gear for welding. Some are made out of cowhide leather and some deer hide. Taking care of these leather welding PPE can be tricky. If you aren’t familiar with how to do it, you could damage the material, leading to its deterioration. Here are some of the most common questions that we can answer when it comes to taking care of your leather welding PPE. 

 

Can I wash Leather welding PPE?

In cleaning leather welding clothing, water should be avoided in general. Ideally, you just need a little bit of lukewarm water. Do not wash directly with water. The biggest factor you need to consider here is the product you are going to use with it. 

 

You need to know that a normal detergent or fabric cleaning ruins the quality and durability of leather. So, if you have been doing this, stop. To begin cleaning, be sure you have the necessary materials: moisturizing bath soap or a mild detergent, leather conditioner, and cleaning rags. 

 

leather welding sleeves

 

The next thing you need to know is that leather should not be washed regularly. Instead, you should only do it once in a while or semi-regularly like twice or thrice a month. 

 

This technique or way of cleaning works for all leather welding PPE like leather welding jackets, leather welding sleeves, and leather welding aprons. 

Can I Wash a Leather welding jacket in a washing machine?

Like we said earlier, you can use a bit of water with some moisturizing soap. But can you throw it in the washing machine? No. Definitely, not. Leather welding jackets are usually made of heavier leather as compared to normal leather jackets. 

 

welding jacket

 

For a step-by-step process, you can read our blog on “How to Clean Leather Welding Jackets.”

 

How to clean leather welding gloves?

There are two ways to do this. First, if your leather welding gloves are not that dirty, you can simply just dust them off using a rag cloth. But, if your gloves already have some burn marks or stain, then using water would be advisable. This doesn’t exactly mean washing them but just using a damp cloth and scrubbing them gently. Same with leather welding jackets, you could also use moisturizing soap or saddle soap. 

 

welding gloves

 

One thing to note is that if ever you find your gloves damp, never ever squeeze them to remove the water. This will deform your gloves and ruin them altogether. Also, never use a hairdryer. Instead, just wipe them with a dry cloth or leave them out to dry. 

 

These are just a few tips on how you can clean your leather welding PPE. If you want them to last longer and if you want to save money as well, start the habit of giving some TLC to those leather welding jackets, leather welding gloves, leather welding aprons, and other leather welding PPE you may have. 

How to Clean Leather Welding Jackets

leather welding jackets

Among all the must-have PPE for welders is the welding jacket. Whether you’re a pro welder or made welding a hobby, you will need to take care of your welding jacket to prolong its service life and get the best out of it. But some welders find it difficult to clean their jackets and feel that it’s such a chore. To help out, here are some easy and practical tips on how to clean your leather welding jacket to help out.

 

How to Clean Leather Welding Jackets: Step by Step Process

Since welding jackets are heavy leather jackets, the dirtier the leather material is, the stiffer the jacket becomes. Also, if left unkempt, the smell will become unpleasant. So cleaning your welding jacket on a semi-regular basis is essential to prolong wearability. 

To begin cleaning, be sure you have the necessary materials: moisturizing bath soap or a mild detergent, leather conditioner, and cleaning rags. 

 

welding leather jacket
Waylander Welding Jacket

How to Clean Leather Welding Jackets: Step 1

 

The first step is to moisten your rag. Get it completely wet with lukewarm water, then wring it out. You want it barely damp. 

 

How to Clean Leather Welding Jackets: Step 2

 

Second, place a few drops of moisturizing bath soap on the rag. Once the soap makes its way into the rag, knead it to spread the soap evenly. 

 

How to Clean Leather Welding Jackets: Step 3

Third, scrub the jacket with the rag gently. If, for example, the jacket is heavily soiled, rinse the rag and apply more soap. Do this periodically, so you don’t end up rubbing the dirt around. The soap helps soften up the leather where it has gotten stiff. Of course, the soap will definitely make your jacket smell so much better!

 

How to Clean Leather Welding Jackets: Step 4

Fourth, rinse off the soapy areas of the jacket. Use a separate barely damp rag to rinse off the soaped areas. Do this every time you finish scrubbing a spot. This cleaning system helps keep the soap from drying on the jacket. Remember that you do not want to use water directly on the jacket, which is why a damp rag is a way to go. Don’t forget to give that “rinse rag” a good rinse now and then. 

 

How to Clean Leather Welding Jackets: Step 5

Fifth, once done with the soap-and-water step, it is time to condition the welding jacket. For this step, use a leave-on leather conditioner. A leave-on leather conditioner makes your welding jacket supple and comfortable again. Work the conditioner with a clean and dry rag. Let it remain on the weather to prevent the leather from cracking. This step is crucial because it makes your leather welding jackets pliable and easy to work in. 

 

If your welding jacket already has mildew, spot treat the mold and mildew first—mold and mildew build-up when a welding jacket is old but can quickly be restored. Use rubbing alcohol before starting the cleaning process.

 

Your leather welding jackets require a good cleaning now and then. Since the jacket is made out of leather, the cleaning procedure is a lot more delicate. Proper maintenance not only gets rid of layers of grimes from building up, but it is the best way to reduce costs in terms of purchasing welding equipment and PPE.

leather welding jackets
Waylander Welding Jacket

How to Choose the right Welding Jacket

welding jacket

How to Choose the right Welding Jacket

welding jacket

Choosing the right welding jacket is a skill you must have as a welder. Your work ranges from high end heavy industrial welding down to simple lightweight metal fabrication. With that comes different types of welding jackets to choose from. Here we give you a complete guide on how to choose the right welding jacket specifically for your job.

For whatever work you do, you need to have the right welding clothing and protective equipment. It’s not an option, it’s a need.

welding jacket

What are welding jackets used for?

Welding jackets are designed to give full protection from the neck down to the waist and also to the shoulder down to the arms against burns from heat, sparks, and weld splatter. It also protects your skin from the intense UV and IR radiation from a welding arc which increases the risk of skin cancer.  While welding jackets are primarily for welding, of course, it can also be used when oxy-fuel cutting or heavy grinding.

Choosing the right welding jacket for the job

What is the best type of welding jacket?

The primary features of a welding jacket are pretty basic. It needs to be durable, fire-resistant, can provide thermal insulation, electrical resistance, and heat protection. Most importantly, it needs to be made out of high-quality materials and is comfortable and easy to use.  The quality of materials used for a welding jacket directly impacts the durability and price of a welding jacket. So if you go for a cheap one, you get less durability and quality. While there are different types of welding jackets, some are better than others and it depends on the quality of the material and the kind of job you do.

Types of Welding Jackets

Welding jackets are classified according to materials used in their manufacturing. There are cotton welding jackets, leather welding jackets, and nylon/kevlar welding jackets. Take a look at how they’re different and get to know which one fits the kinds of job you do.

Cotton welding jacket

If you work in warmer climates or you want a welding jacket for summer, and you perform medium or light work, the cotton welding jacket is best for you. Cotton itself is flammable but these are altered chemically to make it fire-resistant. These are lightweight, flexible, and breathable and are the most affordable type of welding jacket in the market.

Leather welding jacket

Leather welding jackets are for those who work in cooler climates and engage in heavy-weight welding work like high-end MIG and TIG welding. Leather is the most durable material when it comes to welding jackets and is best known for its properties like thermal resistance and fire resistance. This immediately makes it the top choice welders who do heavy welding work. Leather welding jackets can either be top grain and split grain which have different tanning and cutting methods. Whichever you choose, you are sure to be free from skin irritations.

welding jacket

The best type of leather used in manufacturing welding jackets is cowhide. It is durable and strong and won’t crack easily like other leather types yet breathable and flexible. It is resistant to heat and punctures and moisture. This makes cowhide leather welding jackets a top choice.

welding jacket

Nylon/Kevlar welding jacket

Nylon is a synthetic fabric that is lightweight, stretchable yet strong. Kevlar is a heat-resistant strong synthetic fiber. The combination of both produces fine material that primarily prevents skin burns. It is suitable for all industrial and heavy-duty welding work as it is breathable and highly flexible making it a good choice for those who also work in warmer climates.

What is the best size for a welding jacket?

Choosing the right size for a welding jacket is essential. If you pick the wrong one, you end up feeling uncomfortable which would affect work performance. Before you go ahead and choose a size, make sure to measure the size of your chest by wrapping a measuring tape around the upper body. If your belly area is considerably bigger, then measure the stomach area.  It is important you don’t wrap the measuring tape too tight to your body. A little allowance is always better. A tip would be to take the measurement while you wear your regular work clothes.

Which is more important, welding jacket material or convenience and comfort?

While some would prefer welding jacket material over convenience and comfort, the fact of the matter is safety comes first. So, in choosing, you should go with the one that you’re comfortable with so you avoid the risk of danger. There are some manufacturers who give a balance to high-quality material and comfort in welding jackets and it is up to you to find one that fits your need and your want.  Welders around the world need maximum protection from head to toe since they work in a high-risk environment. Underestimating what welding jackets can do by wearing the wrong one can expose welders to unwanted injuries or accidents. So whether it’s welding, oxy-fuel cutting, or heavy grinding, it’s a must to choose the right welding jacket specific for your job.

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