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How to Care for a Carbon Felt Welding Blanket

a carbon felt welding blanket

One essential safety measure in welding is the use of welding blankets, with carbon felt welding blankets being a popular choice. These blankets serve as a protective barrier against sparks, slag, and heat, keeping you and your surroundings safe. To ensure your investment lasts and offers maximum protection, it’s crucial to know how to care for a carbon felt welding blanket.

How to Care for a Carbon Felt Welding Blanket

Regular Cleaning

Regular cleaning is the cornerstone of caring for your carbon felt welding blanket. After each use, inspect the blanket for any signs of burns, tears, or excessive wear. If any damage is visible, repair or replace the blanket to maintain its effectiveness. For general cleaning, shake off loose debris and use a brush to remove any stubborn particles. If there are any stains, you can use a mild detergent and water to gently scrub them away. Be sure to rinse thoroughly and allow the blanket to dry completely before storage.

Carbon Felt Welding Blanket, Proper Storage 

Proper storage is essential to prevent your carbon felt welding blanket from becoming damaged or contaminated. When not in use, store it in a cool, dry place away from direct sunlight, moisture, and extreme temperatures. Avoid folding it tightly, as this can cause creases that reduce its effectiveness. Instead, roll it up loosely to maintain its structural integrity. Using a dedicated storage bag can also help protect the blanket from dust and debris.

Protection from Sparks and Splatter

While carbon felt welding blankets are designed to withstand sparks and splatter, it’s essential to take extra precautions to prolong their lifespan. Position the blanket in a way that it doesn’t come into direct contact with the welding arc, and make sure it’s not in the line of fire for any molten metal splatter. Additionally, consider using additional protective materials, like silicone-coated fiberglass sheets, in high-risk areas to further shield the blanket from intense heat.

a carbon felt welding blanket

Avoid Chemical Exposure

Carbon felt welding blankets are durable, but they can be sensitive to certain chemicals. Avoid contact with oils, solvents, and acidic substances, as they can weaken the fabric and reduce its fire-resistant properties. If any chemical exposure occurs, clean the affected area immediately with mild detergent and water to prevent long-term damage.

Regular Inspection and Replacement

Regularly inspect your carbon felt welding blanket for signs of wear and tear, including thinning, discoloration, or any areas where the carbon felt has lost its integrity. If you notice any of these issues, it may be time to consider replacing the blanket. Investing in a new one is a small price to pay compared to the safety risks associated with a damaged welding blanket.

Caring for your carbon felt welding blanket is crucial for ensuring the safety of your welding operations and the longevity of your investment. Regular cleaning, proper storage, protection from sparks and splatter, avoiding chemical exposure, and regular inspection are all important steps in maintaining your welding blanket. By following these guidelines, you can continue to rely on your carbon felt welding blanket for efficient and safe welding operations while extending its lifespan. Remember, a well-maintained welding blanket not only protects you but also safeguards your work environment from the hazards of welding.

Flammable Materials You Should Never Wear while Welding

welder working

Part of the welding workforce must think about the functionality and practicality of their work attire while others are more focused on how they appear when getting ready for work. For some, this entails dressing in flame-resistant (FR) attire while working.  You might be shocked to learn which fabrics are among the most combustible and how frequently clothes producers still use them.

 

It’s critical to remember that flammability varies depending on a variety of elements, including the fabric’s construction, fiber content, and chemical treatments.  However, if fire threats are a regular part of your workday, you should avoid using these extremely combustible products that are prohibited by the United States Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA).

 

Flammable Materials you should never wear while welding

The following materials are forbidden in work clothing, whether they are used alone or in blends, according to the Occupational Safety and Health Standard 1910.269 of the United States Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), “unless the employer demonstrates that the fabric has been treated to withstand the conditions that the employee may encounter or that the employee wears the clothing in such a manner as to eliminate the hazard involved.”

Acetate

When melted onto another surface, acetate burns quickly and is difficult to remove. This is crucial for any non-FR apparel that is worn underneath FR clothes. Even while these undergarments may not come in direct contact with heat or flames, they could nonetheless be subjected to enough thermal energy to melt.

Nylon

Because nylon is a synthetic fabric that shrinks when burned, it is not good to wear it while welding. It easily catches fire with just one spark, sticks to the skin, and makes burns worse. Nylon fibers continue to stick to the flesh even after the fire has been put out, doing further damage.

 

welder working
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Polyester

Polyester fibers in synthetic fabric are not flammable. Polyester fabric, though, is flame-resistant. This fabric will melt at a high temperature. Never wear this synthetic material since it will ignite and burn rapidly.

 

Rayon

Cotton is equally as highly flammable as rayon, acetate, and triacetate. Acetate and triacetate may also melt and result in severe burns. The flammability of nylon, polyester, acrylic, and olefin is low. However, the melting of the fiber after ignition might result in severe burns.

 

Polypropylene

Because the polymer is easily combustible due to its chemical makeup, flame retardancy becomes a crucial need. Polypropylene dissolves in aromatic hydrocarbons like benzene and toluene at temperatures above 100 °C.

 

Welding in Summer: How to Avoid the Risks

a welder working in the summer

Welding in itself is already a challenge. Welding in extreme weather conditions adds to that challenge. And if you’re welding in summer, there are some risks and you need to avoid them and take extra precautions. Here we talk about the risks and how you, as a welder, could avoid them. 

 

Welding in the Summer: The Risks

According to CDC, 285 construction workers died from heat-related causes between 1992 and 2016, more than a third of all U.S. occupational deaths from heat exposure. While many of the risks of welding in hot weather are universal to all jobs, some are specific to welding.

 

Sweat

The first is sweat. Even if it isn’t summer, sweating is normal while on the job. You are dealing with molten steel after all. But during summer, the amount of sweat you produce doubles and that poses a threat. Sweat can drip into your eyes and it can affect your performance. It can also affect your ability to grip objects. The biggest threat, though, is electrocution. If your clothes or welding gloves get saturated with sweat, a single touch can shock you. 

 

pipeline welder working

Heat Stroke/Heat Exhaustion

The most serious heat-related sickness is heat stroke. It happens when the body loses the ability to regulate its temperature, causing the body’s temperature to increase quickly, the sweating system to malfunction, and the body to be unable to cool down. Within 10 to 15 minutes after the onset of heat stroke, the body temperature can reach 106°F or more.

 

Heat exhaustion, on the other hand, is when the body reacts to an excessive loss of water and salt because of excessive sweating. This then produces heat exhaustion. 

 

It’s normal for you to do work with fire and heat. But if you have the heat of the sun competing with that, working becomes more difficult. You lose energy easily and you get disoriented. You start to get blurry vision and you experience shortness of breath. The worst thing that can happen is you pass out while on the job and that is never good. 

 

Distractions

If you feel hot, you get distracted. You lose concentration because of discomfort. Sweat dripping from a welder’s face can easily distract one from the welding job at hand. Getting distracted at any point while working can pose a threat not just to the welder himself/herself, but to other people around as well. 

 

What can welders do to avoid the risks?

There are a few things a welder can do in order to avoid the risks of welding in the summer. 

 

Drink a lot of water. Stay hydrated. 

When dealing with heat, staying hydrated is always key. A welder battles the sun in addition to having white-hot flame inches from his body. Everything is fighting against him and it sucks the water from the body. Don’t rely on any one symptom to determine when to stop and get some water because heat exhaustion can happen even if you aren’t sweating. Recognize your boundaries and lean on the side of caution – drink a lot of water.

 

Use Sweat Absorption Clothing

 

Wearing the appropriate summer welding clothing is very important. You need lightweight, light-colored, and flame-retardant welding clothing that protects you and helps you keep cool while at work. This would reduce the risks of sweating and heat stroke. 

 

welder at work

Use Cooling Bands

Welders frequently use cooling bands to prevent heat fatigue. Use lightweight commercial cooling bands and cooling belts to direct cool air to the head and core to keep the body cool. Many of these devices are designed specifically for the welding profession, which means that they offer priceless heat protection without restricting the welder’s range of motion or ability to do the task safely.

 

These are just some of the things that you can do as a welder to avoid the risks while welding in the summer. So, the next time you start work, remember to always bring a water bottle with you and take a break to stay hydrated. 

What’s the best Leather for Welding?

best leather for welding

Leather is a natural material that has been used for centuries to make clothes, shoes, and other items. It is made from animal skin and fat and can be made from many different animals including cows, elks, pigs, goats, deer, and sheep. All these types of leather have their own unique properties which can be used to determine the best type to use in certain situations. Here we talk about the best leather for welding for the best welding protection

 

Types of Leather, what’s the best leather for welding?

Before we decide on anything, it’s best to get to know the types of leather and what makes them different from each other. 

 

Goatskin

Goatskin is suitable for jobs requiring high tensile strength and flexibility. This type of leather is thin, soft, and pliable but it provides excellent protection against cuts and abrasion. The higher lanolin levels in the skin provide a moisture barrier, and the thin nature of the material allows for excellent fingertip control. 

 

Because of this, Goatskin leather is ideal for MIG welding. When combined with dexterity, it makes an excellent choice for TIG welding. Kidskin, very soft and lightweight leather from young goats also provides the required durability and abrasion resistance and is the highest quality leather for fingertip sensitivity.

 

Cowhide

The most common type of leather used for welding clothing is cowhide leather. This is because it is durable and flexible. It can withstand the heat generated by the welding process and will not melt like other types of leather would.

 

Its tough structure resists abrasion, sparks, and spatter, making it an excellent choice for tough jobs involving metal inert gas and stick welding. Cowhide is naturally water- and dirt-resistant, making it simple to care for. Although slightly more durable than elkskin, it is not as soft. 

 

Cowhide, on the other hand, is preferred over other non-leather materials for comfort, allowing it to be worn for longer periods of time. Cowhide leather is an excellent choice due to its abundant supply and durability.

 

welder at work

Deerskin

Deerskin gets its toughness from the fact that deer spend so much of their time in thorny, rough environments. Despite its toughness, deerskin leather is lightweight and pliable, making it one of the softest and warmest leathers readily accessible. It’s also one of the few types of leather that, when wet, returns to its original shape and softness. Thicker cuts of deerskin leather are ideal for MIG welding, while thinner cuts are ideal for TIG welding.

 

Pigskin

Pigskin is a dense leather, so it is less flexible than other leathers on the market. But because of the small pores in the skin, it allows the wearer’s skin to breathe which is great for welding gloves. Pigskin leather has a supple feel and retains its softness after being wet. Pigskin leather, though, is not recommended for use in areas where moisture levels are typically high. This type of leather is ideal for MIG and stick welders who require a high level of durability.

 

Elkskin

Elkskin leather is one of the softest and thickest leathers available. It’s the most heat-, flame-, and abrasion-resistant leather, and it won’t harden as quickly as other options. It remains soft even in hot and humid conditions and conforms to your hand, allowing you to move freely and comfortably. Elkskin’s heat resistance makes it ideal for stick welding.

 

Sheepskin

Unlike other leathers, sheepskin is tanned with the wool intact. Wool acts as an insulator and is resistant to flames and static electricity. Sheepskin is thin and elastic, allowing for flexibility and sensitivity, making it ideal for TIG welding. Its natural lanolin content helps heal sensitive and inflamed skin, and the fibers absorb perspiration.

Pipeline Welding Hazards and Pipeline Welding Clothing

pipeline welder working

Pipeline welding and being in the oil and gas industry can be a very challenging but rewarding job. The truth is, whatever environment you work in as long as you weld, you expose yourself to different hazards. But being in the pipeline industry just comes with its own unique challenges. Because of that, it pays to know what kind of hazards you face on the job and what kind of pipeline welding clothing you need.

 

Pipeline Welding Hazards and Pipeline Welding Clothing 

Electric Shock

Arc welding is done almost every day at pipelines. This exposes you to electric shock from the arc between the electrode and the base material that fuse the materials together.

 

As a pipeline welder, you should know better than skimp on high-quality welding PPE. Your job puts you more at risk and that means you need to invest in the right welding gear to protect you from electricity. That includes extremely spark and heat-resistant or flame-resistant welding clothing made of premium leather materials. Make sure you add high-quality welding gloves and dry gloves to that investment and make sure you wear them all the time! 

 

Extreme Weather

Harsh weather conditions are one of the biggest enemies you encounter as a pipeline welder because much of the work is done outdoors. You can either work in a hot or humid environment or in a place where the temperature can get really low. Some work on ocean platforms while others work on rigs where they encounter strong winds. 

 

To protect yourself from extreme weather conditions, go for warm, heat-resistant welder gear and get extreme climate FR insulated coveralls. 

 

If you work in cold temperatures, get welding PPE for winter. But if you’re a pipeline welder working in a hot or humid environment, get welding PPE welders use in the summer

 

pipeline welder working

Eye Protection

Pipeline welders like you work on or near oil rigs. Whenever pipeline repairs are done, you are exposed to flying debris, harmful sparks, and metal projectiles in dusty conditions. Other than that, you are exposed to UV rays from the welding arc and the sun. 

 

You need the proper eye and head protection like safety glasses or goggles, a welding cap, welding hoods, helmets, and shields that auto-darkening and anti-fog features.

 

Welding Splatter and molten Metal

This is always a concern as long as you are a welder. The proper pipeline welding clothing you need to protect you from welding splatter or molten metal would be a proper FR welding jacket, a welding face mask, a high-quality welding apron, welding spats or show protectors, and the right welding gloves.  

 

Sharp Objects

Working as a pipeline welder, you are exposed to extremely sharp objects and surfaces when you move parts and adjust welded objects. One wrong move and you get injured.

 

A way for you to protect yourself is to get cut-protection gloves. Make sure you buy the right welding gloves preferably one made with leather and Kevlar. That way, you get the flexibility and protection you need. 

 

pipeline welder

Risky Work Positions

Whether you are suspended in the air or you work on an ocean platform, you know you have some risky work positions and these cannot be avoided. Make sure you get crush protection gear. These are the back-of-hand protection you need as a pipe welder. All you need are a pair of impact gloves. According to the International Safety Equipment Association, there is a standard for hand protection that addresses the abrasion, cut, tear, and puncture performance of gloves. 

 

How to care for Pipeline Welding Clothing

As a pipeline welder, you should know how to care for welding clothing. You need to learn how to clean a welder’s work clothes like how to get rid of welding dust/coal dirt, how to clean heavily soiled or heavily stained welding clothing, and how to get grease stains out of welding PPE that has been dried. You also need to learn more about how to wash FR clothing. That way you ensure that your welding clothing lasts longer.

What Not to Do When Wearing FR Clothing

welder working

It’s not enough that you wear Flame Retardant (FR) clothing. It pays to know the right way to wear them and know what not to do when wearing them. Remember, wearing FR clothing correctly can give maximum protection, but if worn improperly or out of the industry standards, they become less effective. Here we give you the common mistakes welders do in wearing FR clothing. 

What not to do in wearing FR Clothing

Do not wear FR clothing without a Non-FR outer layer

While you have your FR clothing on, you need to make sure that you are wearing an FR outer layer. It can be tempting to wear a non-FR jacket most especially during the cold weather. But chances are, that outer layer can still ignite and burn putting you at risk. 

Do not wear a Non-FR synthetic underlayer

One other thing you need to remember is that when you wear FR clothing, make sure you are wearing an FR underlayer as well. T-shirts that are made out of polyester or synthetic materials can help with moisture management but these are not flame resistant and can even melt to the skin. 

 

two welders working
Photo via unsplash.com

Do not roll up your sleeves

While this can be a challenge most especially if you are beating the heat, rolling up your sleeves exposes your arms to welding spatter. The best thing to do is to look for FR clothing that is lightweight so you get maximum comfort and maximum protection. 

 

Do not unbutton your FR clothing

It’s important to know that unbuttoning your FR clothing can expose your skin to heat and welding spatter. If you’re wearing non FR clothing underneath, for example, heat can easily ignite and burn which leaves you unprotected. 

 

welder working
Photo via unsplash.com

Do not leave your shirt untucked

In wearing welding clothing, you should always check if your shirt is tucked in properly. If not, heat and flame can go under and lead to greater injury. Make sure that when you buy FR clothing, get one that is purposefully made with long shirttails. 

 

These are just some of the things a welder needs to remember when wearing FR clothing to get that maximum protection that it is made to provide. 

How to Clean a Welder’s Work Clothes

welder working in a workshop

Welding is a satisfying yet messy job. There are welding splatters all over and it’s done in a pretty messy environment. It could be in construction at one point where dust is everywhere or it could be in a workshop or factory where there’s grease all around, or it might be in a mining area where you get coal dirt all over your work clothes. The point is, at the end of the day, you are left with welding jackets, welding aprons, and clothes that need a whole lot of cleaning. 

 

If you live with a welder – a wife, husband, son, brother, or sister – or you’re a welder yourself, you’re probably asking yourself how you could best clean a welder’s clothes. For all you know, you’ve been doing it wrong, which might be why your welding clothes haven’t lasted that long. To know for sure, here are some answers to some questions you might have about how to clean a welder’s clothes.

 

Before we answer any of these questions, “clothes” in this context would be anything worn by a welder that isn’t made out of leather. You need to remember that leather welding clothing like a leather welding jacket cannot be machine washed. You will only need a damp cloth and some soap to get the job done. That being said, let’s get to it.

How to clean a Welder’s Work Clothes: What you need to know

How do you get welding dust/coal dirt out of work clothes?

The best way to get welding dust or coal dirt out of a welder’s clothes is to pour ¾ cups of white distilled vinegar into a bucket. To that, you add ½ cup of laundry detergent and a gallon of warm water. Stir the solution and when ready, submerge the coal-stained work clothes, rub the solution on the coal stains, and soak for around 30 minutes. Rinse the clothes with warm water and launder them with detergent and oxygen bleach. If after drying them and you see more coal staging, treat it by sponging it with alcohol. Wash them again and leave them to dry. Coal dirt can be stubborn. If you don’t handle it well, it could be more difficult to clean.

How do you clean heavily soiled/heavily stained work clothes?

Heavily soiled work clothes or heavily stained work clothes can be difficult to clean and Denise Jordan, a cleaning expert, shares a very specific and effective way to handle these stains. This would work great for heavily soiled or heavily stained jeans. 

 

The first thing to do is to treat the stain with a stain remover. This could be a mixture of equal parts of vinegar, degreaser, and water. Scrub that solution with a brush on the stained area and soak it for 2-3 hours. But, if heavily soiled, you can soak them overnight. If you have just a few pieces of clothing, you can use a bucket. 

 

dirty welders clothes

 

After soaking, you can throw the work clothes in your washer and do a pre-wash before a soak cycle. After this, you need to do a complete cycle using only vinegar in the detergent bin. Once that cycle is done, you need to wash the clothes with detergent and then put vinegar in the fabric softener cycle. This will make work clothes softer and will also help remove unwanted odor. Once the cycle is done, make sure you put them in the dryer. 

 

How to get grease stains out of clothes that have been dried

Finding grease stains on work clothes that have been washed and dried can be frustrating. But not to worry, there’s an effective way to deal with that. All you need is a dish detergent and scrub or toothbrush. 

 

What you need to do is to dampen the grease stain with water then cover it with liquid dish detergent. You could also use bar soap or shampoo. Use the scrub to get the detergent into the stain then rise the detergent with water. Wash the clothes with laundry detergent at the hottest water temperature possible (according to your clothings’ label). Once that cycle is done, allow air-drying. You want to make sure that the stain is removed before putting it in the dryer. If you still have that stain, repeat the process until the stain is completely gone. 

 

welder at work

 

If the grease stain is still there, you can proceed to use a WD-40, baking soda, a piece of cardboard, dish detergent, and a scrub. 

 

Put the piece of cardboard under the stain. Carefully spray a little WD-40 and sprinkle a generous among of baking soda. Rub that baking soda well into the stain with a brush. After that, pour the dish detergent and let it sit for a good 30 minutes. Then, wash as usual and air dry. Repeat the process if the stain is still there. If it’s gone, wash as usual.

What is the Best Welding Blanket for a Smoker?

meat being grilled in a smoker

Welding blankets are, first and foremost, for welding. But because of its heat-resistant properties, it’s been used for many other things. Others use it to protect the ground or patio surfaces under a fire pit while some people use it to retain the heat in smokers and grills when the temps fall below freezing. For smokers, in particular, you need one that is guaranteed to work well when you use it at home with friends or family. With that, here’s a guide that can help you choose the best welding blanket for your smoker. 

 

Best Welding blanket for Smoker – Fiberglass Welding Blanket

In choosing the best welding blanket for smoker, you need to know the right material. It should be heat resistant and should be able to work in high temperatures. 

 

Welding blankets are usually made of fiberglass, leather, and felt. While leather and felt are effective in insulation and can resist heat well, the best welding blanket for smokers are those made out of fiberglass. 

 

Heat Resistance

When it comes to heat resistance, BGF Industries says “fiberglass or woven fiberglass fabrics have excellent hear resistance at a relatively low cost. They retain approximately 50% of room temperature tensile strength at 700°F (371°C); approximately 25% at 900°F (482°C); with a softening point of 1555°F (846°C) and a melting point of 2075° F (1121 °C).”

 

It is for this reason that is the best welding blanket for a smoker. The upper surface can resist cold temperatures while keeping the inside of it warm. This means the cooker will keep an optimum temperature for cooking once covered with a fiberglass welding blanket.

 

welding blankets
Waylander Welding Blanket/Photo by user on Amazon

High Temperatures

When it comes to working with high temperatures, a fiberglass welding blanket can definitely withstand the heat that the smoker gives off in the cooking process. This will create an insulation layer that will keep the heat inside. This means you won’t need that much charcoal whenever you cook in cold temperatures or during the winter.  

 

While welding blankets can be used for smokers, one has to know how to properly handle them while grilling at home or anywhere outdoors. Extra care must be taken to avoid injuries and it is very important to make sure that you keep your food away from the blanket material. Do not use welding blankets for smokers if you do not have any knowledge of their proper use. 

 

Waylander Welding Fiberglass Welding Blanket

Now that you already know the best welding blanket for a smoker, it’s time you get one made of high-quality fiberglass that is durable enough to last you years!

 

The Waylander Welding Fiberglass Welding Blanket has been the talk of the welding community on numerous websites. 

fiberglass welding blanket

When you use Waylander’s Fiberglass Welding Blanket with Vermiculite Treatment, you’re ensuring everyone and everything’s safety. This uses high-quality fiberglass, infused with vermiculite to add another layer of fire prevention plus it has the unique property of binding the fiberglass, which significantly decreases shedding and dramatically reduces skin irritation.

 

Hang the blanket to protect walls, drape it over your work surface or place it on the floor. It’s heavy-duty and durable. If your plumbing or welding crew or your mechanics need a high-quality flame retardant blanket in their toolbox or gear, this is the one to buy.

 

So, the next time you get a welding blanket for your smoker, make sure you have the Waylander Welding Fiberglass welding blanket at the top of your list.

Flame Resistant Welding Clothing: What You Need to Know

welder at work

As welders, fire is something we deal with on a daily basis. This is why we go to lengths just to know more about welding protective clothing and equipment and how to get maximum protection while on the job. Here, we get to know more about flame-resistant welding clothing and why it is a need to have them. 

 

What is Flame Resistant Welding clothing?

At first, when you see or hear the word flame resistant, you’d think that fire will simply bounce off that piece of clothing. Let’s get one thing straight. Flame Resistant clothing will still burn when it is directly exposed to flame. But, when that piece of clothing is taken away from the flame, it will stop or cease to burn. 

 

Flame Resistant clothing is made from self-extinguishing materials that stop a piece of clothing from further burning. So, if you have a Flame Resistant welding shirt or Flame Resistant welding jacket, then it means when you get exposed to fire, you have time to pull away from the fire before it brings further damage. 

 

a welder working

Flame Resistant vs Flame Retardant

When you say FR clothing, it can be quite confusing. Why? Because this is usually split into two main groups. You have Flame Resistant clothing and Flame Retardant clothing. What’s the difference between these two?

 

Flame Resistant means the clothing or the fabric itself is literally made of resistant material. It isn’t just a layer or covering. This means, no matter how many times you wash the clothing, it will still be flame resistant. 

 

Flame Retardant, on the other hand, is clothing with a coat of fire-resistant material. The difference it has from flame-resistant clothing is that once that coat of fire-resistant material wears off, then that piece of clothing will just be an ordinary piece of fabric or cloth. 

 

two welders working

 

This is why you should only purchase high-quality flame retardant welding clothing that can last for a longer period of time compared to cheaper FR clothing, which will only last you few months. 

 

FR welding clothing is a must-have. If you need a welding hood to protect your head and hair, you need FR clothing so you won’t burst into flame while on the job. Make sure you choose only the best FR welding clothing that uses high-quality materials. Never settle for anything cheap when it comes to welding protection. In welding, safety is always a top priority.

How To Clean Leather Welding PPE

welder in a leather welding apron

Welders take care of their welding gear and equipment. But when it comes to taking care of their welding personal protective equipment, not a lot can say they make it a priority. Some just wait for their welding jackets or welding gloves to wear out. When that happens, their solution is just to buy a new one. What if we tell you there’s a way you can extend the life span of your leather welding PPE? Here’s how. 

 

How to Clean Leather Welding PPE 

Leather is a common material used when it comes to safety gear for welding. Some are made out of cowhide leather and some deer hide. Taking care of these leather welding PPE can be tricky. If you aren’t familiar with how to do it, you could damage the material, leading to its deterioration. Here are some of the most common questions that we can answer when it comes to taking care of your leather welding PPE. 

 

Can I wash Leather welding PPE?

In cleaning leather welding clothing, water should be avoided in general. Ideally, you just need a little bit of lukewarm water. Do not wash directly with water. The biggest factor you need to consider here is the product you are going to use with it. 

 

You need to know that a normal detergent or fabric cleaning ruins the quality and durability of leather. So, if you have been doing this, stop. To begin cleaning, be sure you have the necessary materials: moisturizing bath soap or a mild detergent, leather conditioner, and cleaning rags. 

 

leather welding sleeves

 

The next thing you need to know is that leather should not be washed regularly. Instead, you should only do it once in a while or semi-regularly like twice or thrice a month. 

 

This technique or way of cleaning works for all leather welding PPE like leather welding jackets, leather welding sleeves, and leather welding aprons. 

Can I Wash a Leather welding jacket in a washing machine?

Like we said earlier, you can use a bit of water with some moisturizing soap. But can you throw it in the washing machine? No. Definitely, not. Leather welding jackets are usually made of heavier leather as compared to normal leather jackets. 

 

welding jacket

 

For a step-by-step process, you can read our blog on “How to Clean Leather Welding Jackets.”

 

How to clean leather welding gloves?

There are two ways to do this. First, if your leather welding gloves are not that dirty, you can simply just dust them off using a rag cloth. But, if your gloves already have some burn marks or stain, then using water would be advisable. This doesn’t exactly mean washing them but just using a damp cloth and scrubbing them gently. Same with leather welding jackets, you could also use moisturizing soap or saddle soap. 

 

welding gloves

 

One thing to note is that if ever you find your gloves damp, never ever squeeze them to remove the water. This will deform your gloves and ruin them altogether. Also, never use a hairdryer. Instead, just wipe them with a dry cloth or leave them out to dry. 

 

These are just a few tips on how you can clean your leather welding PPE. If you want them to last longer and if you want to save money as well, start the habit of giving some TLC to those leather welding jackets, leather welding gloves, leather welding aprons, and other leather welding PPE you may have.